Home > Devotions > Daily Reading – December 10, 2018

Already, But Not Yet

 

22 For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. 23 And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies. 24 For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what he sees? 25 But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience.

– Romans 8:22–25 ESV

“Already, but not yet.” Those words are often used at this time of year to describe the state in which we live. Christ has ALREADY won the victory for us, BUT NOT YET can we fully enjoy what that means. Not on this side of heaven. We still endure the effects of sin until God calls us home or until Christ returns — hence the connection to Advent as we eagerly await Christ’s return.

God, through Paul’s hand, provides a timeless, concrete picture of “already, but not yet” in his letter to the Romans. In an age before 2-, 3-, 4- and 5-D ultrasounds provided a window into the womb, parents were left to wait, wonder and hope as the pains of childbirth progressed. Even today with all of the ultrasounds, fetal heart monitors and constantly evolving technology, pregnancy and childbirth remain a time of waiting, wondering and hoping. Today, too, with epidurals, advances in anesthesia and pain management, and alternative birthing environments and practices, the simple fact remains: childbirth was, is, and always will be an incredibly difficult, painful and often dangerous process.

So is life. We want to know God’s plan for us “already.” We want the 5-D ultrasound not only for this life, but for our future in heaven. But He tells us, “Not yet, have hope.” We want the epidural to block out the unbearable agonies and struggles that befall us “already.” But He tells us, “Not yet, have hope.”

“I’m sure God knows what He’s doing, but really? A baby? Now?”

“I’m sure God knows what He’s doing, but the tests indicate that our baby is going to be born with serious disabilities. Now what?”

“I’m sure God knows what He’s doing, but why hasn’t He blessed us with a child yet?”

“I’m sure God knows what He’s doing, but my son just took his life. How can a loving God allow that to happen?”

“I’m sure God knows what He’s doing, but I’m such a bother to my children and grandchildren. I’m just not worth anything anymore. Can’t it just be over now?”

And the whole creation G R O A N S together, TOGETHER, as in the pains of childbirth. Friends, when these questions arise, we are blessed to be able to lean on, and proclaim, the hope and confidence that is ours as adopted sons and daughters of the King who HAS won for us the eternal victory. Already. But not yet.

Prayer: Lord, we may not always understand your timing, but we trust in your plan for our lives. Help us to relax and have confidence that no matter what happens, you will be right there with us, consoling is, loving us and lifting us up in Jesus name. Amen.

Pro-Life Action: Take some time this Advent to pray for other church members who have experienced an unexpected pregnancy, diagnosis or death in the family, and if possible, pray with them personally.

Today’s devotion was written by Rev. Scott Licht, national director of Lutherans for Life and pastor of Shepherd of the Prairie Lutheran Church in Huxley, Iowa.

This year’s Advent devotions are written by the members of NALC Life Ministries. The devotional follows the daily Revised Common Lectionary for Advent and includes a Bible reading, commentary, prayer and pro-life action for every day until Christmas Eve.

As we move through the season of Advent, Scripture reveals the anxiety of an unplanned pregnancy, as Mary and Joseph ponder this miracle and seek to understand who this precious child might be. This devotional examines our responsibility to protect all human life in light of Mary and Joseph’s protection of Jesus, the savior of the world.

Our authors include Rev. Dr. David Wendel, Rev. Mark Chavez, Rev. Dr. Dennis Di Mauro, Rev. Dr. Cathi Braasch, Rev. Scott Licht, Rev. Sandra Towberman, Rev. Steve Shipman, Ms. Rebecka Andrae, Rev. Melinda Jones, Rev. David Nelson, Ms. Rosemary Johnson, Rev. Mark Werner and Rev. Steve Bliss.

Learn more about NALC Life Ministries

Joshua 22:1–20 (ESV)

The Eastern Tribes Return Home

22 At that time Joshua summoned the Reubenites and the Gadites and the half-tribe of Manasseh, and said to them, “You have kept all that Moses the servant of the Lord commanded you and have obeyed my voice in all that I have commanded you. You have not forsaken your brothers these many days, down to this day, but have been careful to keep the charge of the Lord your God. And now the Lord your God has given rest to your brothers, as he promised them. Therefore turn and go to your tents in the land where your possession lies, which Moses the servant of the Lord gave you on the other side of the Jordan. Only be very careful to observe the commandment and the law that Moses the servant of the Lord commanded you, to love the Lord your God, and to walk in all his ways and to keep his commandments and to cling to him and to serve him with all your heart and with all your soul.” So Joshua blessed them and sent them away, and they went to their tents.

Now to the one half of the tribe of Manasseh Moses had given a possession in Bashan, but to the other half Joshua had given a possession beside their brothers in the land west of the Jordan. And when Joshua sent them away to their homes and blessed them, he said to them, “Go back to your tents with much wealth and with very much livestock, with silver, gold, bronze, and iron, and with much clothing. Divide the spoil of your enemies with your brothers.” So the people of Reuben and the people of Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh returned home, parting from the people of Israel at Shiloh, which is in the land of Canaan, to go to the land of Gilead, their own land of which they had possessed themselves by command of the Lord through Moses.

The Eastern Tribes’ Altar of Witness

10 And when they came to the region of the Jordan that is in the land of Canaan, the people of Reuben and the people of Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh built there an altar by the Jordan, an altar of imposing size. 11 And the people of Israel heard it said, “Behold, the people of Reuben and the people of Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh have built the altar at the frontier of the land of Canaan, in the region about the Jordan, on the side that belongs to the people of Israel.” 12 And when the people of Israel heard of it, the whole assembly of the people of Israel gathered at Shiloh to make war against them.

13 Then the people of Israel sent to the people of Reuben and the people of Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh, in the land of Gilead, Phinehas the son of Eleazar the priest, 14 and with him ten chiefs, one from each of the tribal families of Israel, every one of them the head of a family among the clans of Israel. 15 And they came to the people of Reuben, the people of Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh, in the land of Gilead, and they said to them, 16 “Thus says the whole congregation of the Lord, ‘What is this breach of faith that you have committed against the God of Israel in turning away this day from following the Lord by building yourselves an altar this day in rebellion against the Lord? 17 Have we not had enough of the sin at Peor from which even yet we have not cleansed ourselves, and for which there came a plague upon the congregation of the Lord, 18 that you too must turn away this day from following the Lord? And if you too rebel against the Lord today then tomorrow he will be angry with the whole congregation of Israel. 19 But now, if the land of your possession is unclean, pass over into the Lord’s land where the Lord’s tabernacle stands, and take for yourselves a possession among us. Only do not rebel against the Lord or make us as rebels by building for yourselves an altar other than the altar of the Lord our God. 20 Did not Achan the son of Zerah break faith in the matter of the devoted things, and wrath fell upon all the congregation of Israel? And he did not perish alone for his iniquity.’ ”

Psalm 132 (ESV)

The Lord Has Chosen Zion

132 A Song of Ascents.

Remember, O Lord, in David’s favor,
all the hardships he endured,

how he swore to the Lord
and vowed to the Mighty One of Jacob,

“I will not enter my house
or get into my bed,

I will not give sleep to my eyes
or slumber to my eyelids,

until I find a place for the Lord,
a dwelling place for the Mighty One of Jacob.”

Behold, we heard of it in Ephrathah;
we found it in the fields of Jaar.

“Let us go to his dwelling place;
let us worship at his footstool!”

Arise, O Lord, and go to your resting place,
you and the ark of your might.

Let your priests be clothed with righteousness,
and let your saints shout for joy.

10  For the sake of your servant David,
do not turn away the face of your anointed one.

11  The Lord swore to David a sure oath
from which he will not turn back:

“One of the sons of your body
I will set on your throne.
12  If your sons keep my covenant
and my testimonies that I shall teach them,
their sons also forever
shall sit on your throne.”

13  For the Lord has chosen Zion;
he has desired it for his dwelling place:

14  “This is my resting place forever;
here I will dwell, for I have desired it.
15  I will abundantly bless her provisions;
I will satisfy her poor with bread.
16  Her priests I will clothe with salvation,
and her saints will shout for joy.
17  There I will make a horn to sprout for David;
I have prepared a lamp for my anointed.
18  His enemies I will clothe with shame,
but on him his crown will shine.”

Acts 7:54–8:8 (ESV)

The Stoning of Stephen

54 Now when they heard these things they were enraged, and they ground their teeth at him. 55 But he, full of the Holy Spirit, gazed into heaven and saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing at the right hand of God. 56 And he said, “Behold, I see the heavens opened, and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God.” 57 But they cried out with a loud voice and stopped their ears and rushed together at him. 58 Then they cast him out of the city and stoned him. And the witnesses laid down their garments at the feet of a young man named Saul. 59 And as they were stoning Stephen, he called out, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” 60 And falling to his knees he cried out with a loud voice, “Lord, do not hold this sin against them.” And when he had said this, he fell asleep.

Saul Ravages the Church

And Saul approved of his execution.

And there arose on that day a great persecution against the church in Jerusalem, and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles. Devout men buried Stephen and made great lamentation over him. But Saul was ravaging the church, and entering house after house, he dragged off men and women and committed them to prison.

Philip Proclaims Christ in Samaria

Now those who were scattered went about preaching the word. Philip went down to the city of Samaria and proclaimed to them the Christ. And the crowds with one accord paid attention to what was being said by Philip, when they heard him and saw the signs that he did. For unclean spirits, crying out with a loud voice, came out of many who had them, and many who were paralyzed or lame were healed. So there was much joy in that city.

[Luther writes:] “Here the Spirit plainly ascribes to Scripture that it allumines and teaches, that understanding is given alone through the words of God as through a door for, as they call it, a first principle (principium primum) with which everyone who will come to light and understanding must begin. Again: “‘Principle or head of thine words is truth’ (Ps. 119:160). There you see that truth is here ascribed only to the head of the words of God, that is, if you learned the words of God in the rst place and used them as the first principle when you judged the words of all. And what else does this whole psalm do than to condemn the foolishness of our labor and call us back to the fountain (revocet ad fontem) and teach us that we should rst of all and alone spend our labor on the Word of God and that the Spirit is ready to come voluntarily and to expel our spirit so that we pursue theology without danger? … Therefore, nothing but the divine words are to be the first principles (prima principia) for Christians, all human words, however, are conclusions which are deducted from them and must again be reducted to them and approved by them. They must first of all be well known to everyone but not sought through men nor learned by them, but men must be judged by them. If this were not true, why should Augustine and the holy Fathers, whenever they contradict each other, go back to the holy Scripture as to the first principles of truth (ad sacras literas seu prima principia veritatis) and illumine and approve by their light and trustworthiness their own that is dark and uncertain? By doing so they teach that the divine words are more understand- able and certain than the words of all men, even their own … I do not want to be honored as one who is more learned than all, but this I desire that Scripture alone rule as queen (solam Scripturam regnare), and that it is not explained through my spirit or other men’s spirit but understood by itself and in its own spirit.” (77)

–Johann Michael Reu, Luther on the Scriptures

This daily Bible reading guide, Reading the Word of God, was conceived and prepared as a result of the ongoing discussions between representatives of three church bodies: Lutheran Church—Canada (LCC), The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the North American Lutheran Church (NALC). The following individuals have represented their church bodies and approved this introduction and the reading guide: LCC: President Robert Bugbee; NALC: Bishop John Bradosky, Revs. Mark Chavez, James Nestingen, and David Wendel; LCMS: Revs. Albert Collver, Joel Lehenbauer, John Pless, and Larry Vogel.

Learn More