Home > Reading > Daily Reading – April 20, 2020

2 Chron. 28:22–29:2

28:22 During his time of trouble King Ahaz was even more unfaithful to the Lord. 23He offered sacrifices to the gods of Damascus whom he thought had defeated him. He reasoned, “Since the gods of the kings of Syria helped them, I will sacrifice to them so they will help me.” But they caused him and all Israel to stumble. 24Ahaz gathered the items in God’s temple and removed them. He shut the doors of the Lord’s temple and erected altars on every street corner in Jerusalem. 25In every city throughout Judah he set up high places to offer sacrifices to other gods. He angered the Lord God of his ancestors.

26The rest of the events of Ahaz’s reign, including his accomplishments from start to finish, are recorded in the Scroll of the Kings of Judah and Israel. 27Ahaz passed away and was buried in the city of Jerusalem; they did not bring him to the tombs of the kings of Israel. His son Hezekiah replaced him as king.

29:1 Hezekiah was twenty-five years old when he began to reign, and he reigned twenty-nine years in Jerusalem. His mother was Abijah, the daughter of Zechariah. 2He did what the Lord approved, just as his ancestor David had done.

(NET Bible)

Ps. 101

101:1 A psalm of David.

I will sing about loyalty and justice!

To you, O Lord, I will sing praises!

2I will walkin the way of integrity.

When will you come to me?

I will conduct my business with integrity in the midst of my palace.

3I will not even consider doing what is dishonest.

I hate doing evil;

I will have no part of it.

4I will have nothing to do with a perverse person;

I will not permit evil.

5I will destroy anyone who slanders his neighbor in secret.

I will not tolerate anyone who has a haughty demeanor and an arrogant attitude.

6I will favor the honest people of the land,

and allow them to live with me.

Those who walk in the way of integrity will attend me.

7Deceitful people will not live in my palace.

Liars will not be welcome in my presence.

8Each morning I will destroy all the wicked people in the land,

and remove all evildoers from the city of the Lord.

(NET Bible)

Luke 13:18–30

13:18 Thus Jesus asked, “What is the kingdom of God like? To what should I compare it? 19It is like a mustard seed that a man took and sowed in his garden. It grew and became a tree, and the wild birds nested in its branches.”

20Again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? 21It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed with three measures of flour until all the dough had risen.”

22Then Jesus traveled throughout towns and villages, teaching and making his way toward Jerusalem. 23Someone asked him, “Lord, will only a few be saved?” So he said to them, 24“Exert every effort to enter through the narrow door, because many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able to. 25Once the head of the house gets up and shuts the door, then you will stand outside and start to knock on the door and beg him, ‘Lord, let us in!’ But he will answer you, ‘I don’t know where you come from.’ 26Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank in your presence, and you taught in our streets.’ 27But he will reply, ‘I don’t know where you come from! Go away from me, all you evildoers!’ 28There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and all the prophets in the kingdom of God but you yourselves thrown out. 29Then people will come from east and west, and from north and south, and take their places at the banquet table in the kingdom of God. 30But indeed, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last.”

(NET Bible)

This word of Luther spoken at Worms has o en, unfortunately, been misconstrued. It has been inferred from it that Luther here demanded an unrestricted liberty of thought and conscience, according to which there is no such thing as an objective authority outside of ourselves, and man is responsible to no one but himself, his own subjective, arbitrary conscience. It is not to be denied that natural man would find his greatest delight in such an absolute freedom of thought and conscience, just as such freedom sooner or later always leads to a dissolution of morality and religion but never serves to fortify the same. Such unrestricted individualism, centering only in itself, divorced from all objective authority, was, perhaps, advocated by Italian humanism but never by Luther. This needs no further proof even though historians like Harnack saw fit to write: “ The Reformation protested against all formal, external authority in matters of religion. Thus Luther also protested against the authority of the letter of the Bible.” Whoever appeals to the confession of Luther at Worms in support of this deliberately closes his eyes to the fact that Luther expressly declared, “my conscience is captive to the Word of God.” (19)

–Johann Michael Reu, Luther on the Scriptures

This daily Bible reading guide, Reading the Word of God, was conceived and prepared as a result of the ongoing discussions between representatives of three church bodies: Lutheran Church—Canada (LCC), The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the North American Lutheran Church (NALC). The following individuals have represented their church bodies and approved this introduction and the reading guide: LCC: President Robert Bugbee; NALC: Bishop John Bradosky, Revs. Mark Chavez, James Nestingen, and David Wendel; LCMS: Revs. Albert Collver, Joel Lehenbauer, John Pless, and Larry Vogel.

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