Home > Devotions > Daily Reading – January 11, 2019

A Psalm for Topsy-Turvy Times

 

Ascribe to the Lord, O heavenly beings,
ascribe to the Lord glory and strength.

Ascribe to the Lord the glory due his name;
worship the Lord in the splendor of holiness.

The voice of the Lord is over the waters;
the God of glory thunders,
the Lord, over many waters.

The voice of the Lord is powerful;
the voice of the Lord is full of majesty.

The voice of the Lord breaks the cedars;
the Lord breaks the cedars of Lebanon.

He makes Lebanon to skip like a calf,
and Sirion like a young wild ox.

The voice of the Lord flashes forth flames of fire.

The voice of the Lord shakes the wilderness;
the Lord shakes the wilderness of Kadesh.

The voice of the Lord makes the deer give birth
and strips the forests bare,
and in his temple all cry, “Glory!”

10  The Lord sits enthroned over the flood;
the Lord sits enthroned as king forever.

11  May the Lord give strength to his people!
May the Lord bless his people with peace!

– Psalm 29 ESV

Psalm 29 is appointed for reading on the Baptism of our Lord, so you’ll likely hear it at Sunday worship two days from now (Sunday, January 13). At the Baptism of our Lord, (Matthew 3:13-17), the voice of God resounded, the Holy Spirit descended, the waters of the Jordan rippled and fell from the hands of John onto the Word made flesh, affirming God’s total pleasure with the only begotten Son of His heart.

The 29th psalm connects the eternal promise of God to our daily life as the baptized, the disciples of our Lord Jesus Christ. God’s voice thunders through the heavens, stirring up the waves before making landfall, whipping mighty oaks around and flattening forests. The landscape, from flatlands to mighty mountains, literally rolls and jumps up and down like a young calf frolicking. If read only through the lenses of catastrophe reporters and script writers, Psalm 29 might leave the reader thinking of natural disasters, what we sometimes mistakenly refer to as “acts of God.” But, Psalm 29 is about more that the natural phenomena of storms, earthquakes and other natural disasters.

Taking the 29th psalm to heart prepares us for times when life is turned upside down. All it takes is a life-altering medical diagnosis, an unplanned pregnancy, a family member dealing with an addiction, or loss of the job you have poured your life into, possibly at the expense of other things that are even more important. Indeed, the psalm prepares us for any of those things that are “due to circumstances beyond our control.”

When these upheavals happen, David’s holy poetry reminds me of how the world was turned upside-down, right-side up, inside-out by the incarnation, atoning death and glorious resurrection of the God-Man, Jesus our Christ. The 29th psalm is a testimony to God’s gracious provision in moments of our greatest turmoil.  It’s a psalm for topsy-turvy times in a world that offers a lifetime full of surprises. It’s a prayer that assures us that God is with us, incarnate, all-knowing and all caring amid circumstances that are tearing us apart.

Take God’s Word to heart. Remember your Baptism. When your life is stormy, when all is quaking under your feet and in your soul, sing forth Psalm 29.

Prayer: Your voice, O Lord, is powerful, your Word worthy of all awe and praise. When life is wearying, when circumstances are worrisome, when my soul is quaking, still my heart and surround me with your peace. Show me how I might share your peace and joy with those whose lives are in turmoil for whatever reason, that they might have the hope and blessed assurance that only you can give. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Pro-Life Action: Ask how your congregation specifically connects God’s Word, prayer, encouragement and the hope of Jesus Christ to outreach through food banks, crisis pregnancy centers, support groups, after-school programs and other service ministries.

Today’s devotion was written by Rev. Dr. Cathi Braasch, STS. Rev. Dr. Braasch is a member of the NALC Life Ministries Team and pastor of Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church, Jackson Center, OH.   

This year’s Advent devotions are written by the members of NALC Life Ministries. The devotional follows the daily Revised Common Lectionary for Advent and includes a Bible reading, commentary, prayer and pro-life action for every day until Christmas Eve.

As we move through the season of Advent, Scripture reveals the anxiety of an unplanned pregnancy, as Mary and Joseph ponder this miracle and seek to understand who this precious child might be. This devotional examines our responsibility to protect all human life in light of Mary and Joseph’s protection of Jesus, the savior of the world.

Our authors include Rev. Dr. David Wendel, Rev. Mark Chavez, Rev. Dr. Dennis Di Mauro, Rev. Dr. Cathi Braasch, Rev. Scott Licht, Rev. Sandra Towberman, Rev. Steve Shipman, Ms. Rebecka Andrae, Rev. Melinda Jones, Rev. David Nelson, Ms. Rosemary Johnson, Rev. Mark Werner and Rev. Steve Bliss.

Learn more about NALC Life Ministries

Judges 17 (ESV)

Micah and the Levite

17 There was a man of the hill country of Ephraim, whose name was Micah. And he said to his mother, “The 1,100 pieces of silver that were taken from you, about which you uttered a curse, and also spoke it in my ears, behold, the silver is with me; I took it.” And his mother said, “Blessed be my son by the Lord.” And he restored the 1,100 pieces of silver to his mother. And his mother said, “I dedicate the silver to the Lord from my hand for my son, to make a carved image and a metal image. Now therefore I will restore it to you.” So when he restored the money to his mother, his mother took 200 pieces of silver and gave it to the silversmith, who made it into a carved image and a metal image. And it was in the house of Micah. And the man Micah had a shrine, and he made an ephod and household gods, and ordained one of his sons, who became his priest. In those days there was no king in Israel. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.

Now there was a young man of Bethlehem in Judah, of the family of Judah, who was a Levite, and he sojourned there. And the man departed from the town of Bethlehem in Judah to sojourn where he could find a place. And as he journeyed, he came to the hill country of Ephraim to the house of Micah. And Micah said to him, “Where do you come from?” And he said to him, “I am a Levite of Bethlehem in Judah, and I am going to sojourn where I may find a place.” 10 And Micah said to him, “Stay with me, and be to me a father and a priest, and I will give you ten pieces of silver a year and a suit of clothes and your living.” And the Levite went in. 11 And the Levite was content to dwell with the man, and the young man became to him like one of his sons. 12 And Micah ordained the Levite, and the young man became his priest, and was in the house of Micah. 13 Then Micah said, “Now I know that the Lord will prosper me, because I have a Levite as priest.”

Psalm 10 (ESV)

Why Do You Hide Yourself?

10 Why, O Lord, do you stand far away?
Why do you hide yourself in times of trouble?

In arrogance the wicked hotly pursue the poor;
let them be caught in the schemes that they have devised.

For the wicked boasts of the desires of his soul,
and the one greedy for gain curses and renounces the Lord.

In the pride of his face the wicked does not seek him;
all his thoughts are, “There is no God.”

His ways prosper at all times;
your judgments are on high, out of his sight;
as for all his foes, he puffs at them.

He says in his heart, “I shall not be moved;
throughout all generations I shall not meet adversity.”

His mouth is filled with cursing and deceit and oppression;
under his tongue are mischief and iniquity.

He sits in ambush in the villages;
in hiding places he murders the innocent.
His eyes stealthily watch for the helpless;

he lurks in ambush like a lion in his thicket;
he lurks that he may seize the poor;
he seizes the poor when he draws him into his net.

10  The helpless are crushed, sink down,
and fall by his might.

11  He says in his heart, “God has forgotten,
he has hidden his face, he will never see it.”

12  Arise, O Lord; O God, lift up your hand;
forget not the afflicted.

13  Why does the wicked renounce God
and say in his heart, “You will not call to account”?

14  But you do see, for you note mischief and vexation,
that you may take it into your hands;
to you the helpless commits himself;
you have been the helper of the fatherless.

15  Break the arm of the wicked and evildoer;
call his wickedness to account till you find none.

16  The Lord is king forever and ever;
the nations perish from his land.

17  O Lord, you hear the desire of the afflicted;
you will strengthen their heart; you will incline your ear

18  to do justice to the fatherless and the oppressed,
so that man who is of the earth may strike terror no more.

Acts 19:1–10 (ESV)

Paul in Ephesus

19 And it happened that while Apollos was at Corinth, Paul passed through the inland country and came to Ephesus. There he found some disciples. And he said to them, “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” And they said, “No, we have not even heard that there is a Holy Spirit.” And he said, “Into what then were you baptized?” They said, “Into John’s baptism.” And Paul said, “John baptized with the baptism of repentance, telling the people to believe in the one who was to come after him, that is, Jesus.” On hearing this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. And when Paul had laid his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they began speaking in tongues and prophesying. There were about twelve men in all.

And he entered the synagogue and for three months spoke boldly, reasoning and persuading them about the kingdom of God. But when some became stubborn and continued in unbelief, speaking evil of the Way before the congregation, he withdrew from them and took the disciples with him, reasoning daily in the hall of Tyrannus. 10 This continued for two years, so that all the residents of Asia heard the word of the Lord, both Jews and Greeks.

Luther’s first statements concerning this matter we find in the marginal notes written by him in his personal copy of the Sentences of Lombardus, which, in 1510, as a Sententiarius he was called upon to teach. Here we find statements such as the following: “But you, dear reader, whoever you may be, take this as the word of a simple man: no one has ever yet had the experience that the vapors of the earth have illuminated the heavens, but rather that they hold back the light from the earth. By that I want to say that theology is heaven, or, to put it still better, the kingdom of heaven. Man is the earth, and his speculations are the vapors; now understand the rest and see for what reason there are such great di erences of opinion among the doctors. Note, too, that a swine has never been able to teach Minerva even though it o en imagines that it can.”   “All light must come from revelation, the human understanding is unable to understand supernatural matters.”   “For since no one has seen them, whatever is added to revelation is certainly nothing but human invention.”   “Arguments based on reason determine nothing, but because the Holy Ghost says it is true, it is true.” In connection with a disputed question Luther affirms, “though many famous doctors hold this opinion, yet they do not have Scripture on their side but only arguments of reason. But I have the words of Scripture on my side in this opinion that the soul is the image of God, and so I say with the Apostle, ‘Though an angel from heaven, that is, a doctor of the Church, teaches otherwise let him be anathema!’” (13)

–Johann Michael Reu, Luther on the Scriptures

This daily Bible reading guide, Reading the Word of God, was conceived and prepared as a result of the ongoing discussions between representatives of three church bodies: Lutheran Church—Canada (LCC), The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the North American Lutheran Church (NALC). The following individuals have represented their church bodies and approved this introduction and the reading guide: LCC: President Robert Bugbee; NALC: Bishop John Bradosky, Revs. Mark Chavez, James Nestingen, and David Wendel; LCMS: Revs. Albert Collver, Joel Lehenbauer, John Pless, and Larry Vogel.

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