Home > Devotions > Daily Reading – October 24, 2018

Job 28 (ESV)

Job Continues: Where Is Wisdom?

28 “Surely there is a mine for silver,
and a place for gold that they refine.
Iron is taken out of the earth,
and copper is smelted from the ore.
Man puts an end to darkness
and searches out to the farthest limit
the ore in gloom and deep darkness.
He opens shafts in a valley away from where anyone lives;
they are forgotten by travelers;
they hang in the air, far away from mankind; they swing to and fro.
As for the earth, out of it comes bread,
but underneath it is turned up as by fire.
Its stones are the place of sapphires,
and it has dust of gold.

“That path no bird of prey knows,
and the falcon’s eye has not seen it.
The proud beasts have not trodden it;
the lion has not passed over it.

“Man puts his hand to the flinty rock
and overturns mountains by the roots.
10  He cuts out channels in the rocks,
and his eye sees every precious thing.
11  He dams up the streams so that they do not trickle,
and the thing that is hidden he brings out to light.

12  “But where shall wisdom be found?
And where is the place of understanding?
13  Man does not know its worth,
and it is not found in the land of the living.
14  The deep says, ‘It is not in me,’
and the sea says, ‘It is not with me.’
15  It cannot be bought for gold,
and silver cannot be weighed as its price.
16  It cannot be valued in the gold of Ophir,
in precious onyx or sapphire.
17  Gold and glass cannot equal it,
nor can it be exchanged for jewels of fine gold.
18  No mention shall be made of coral or of crystal;
the price of wisdom is above pearls.
19  The topaz of Ethiopia cannot equal it,
nor can it be valued in pure gold.

20  “From where, then, does wisdom come?
And where is the place of understanding?
21  It is hidden from the eyes of all living
and concealed from the birds of the air.
22  Abaddon and Death say,
‘We have heard a rumor of it with our ears.’

23  “God understands the way to it,
and he knows its place.
24  For he looks to the ends of the earth
and sees everything under the heavens.
25  When he gave to the wind its weight
and apportioned the waters by measure,
26  when he made a decree for the rain
and a way for the lightning of the thunder,
27  then he saw it and declared it;
he established it, and searched it out.
28  And he said to man,
‘Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom,
and to turn away from evil is understanding.’ ”

Psalm 109:1–20 (ESV)

Be not silent, O God of my praise!

For wicked and deceitful mouths are opened against me,
speaking against me with lying tongues.

They encircle me with words of hate,
and attack me without cause.

In return for my love they accuse me,
but I give myself to prayer.

So they reward me evil for good,
and hatred for my love.

Appoint a wicked man against him;
let an accuser stand at his right hand.

When he is tried, let him come forth guilty;
let his prayer be counted as sin!

May his days be few;
may another take his office!

May his children be fatherless
and his wife a widow!

10  May his children wander about and beg,
seeking food far from the ruins they inhabit!

11  May the creditor seize all that he has;
may strangers plunder the fruits of his toil!

12  Let there be none to extend kindness to him,
nor any to pity his fatherless children!

13  May his posterity be cut off;
may his name be blotted out in the second generation!

14  May the iniquity of his fathers be remembered before the Lord,
and let not the sin of his mother be blotted out!

15  Let them be before the Lord continually,
that he may cut off the memory of them from the earth!

16  For he did not remember to show kindness,
but pursued the poor and needy
and the brokenhearted, to put them to death.

17  He loved to curse; let curses come upon him!
He did not delight in blessing; may it be far from him!

18  He clothed himself with cursing as his coat;
may it soak into his body like water,
like oil into his bones!

19  May it be like a garment that he wraps around him,
like a belt that he puts on every day!

20  May this be the reward of my accusers from the Lord,
of those who speak evil against my life!

Luke 16:1–13 (ESV)

The Parable of the Dishonest Manager

16 He also said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was wasting his possessions. And he called him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Turn in the account of your management, for you can no longer be manager.’ And the manager said to himself, ‘What shall I do, since my master is taking the management away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. I have decided what to do, so that when I am removed from management, people may receive me into their houses.’ So, summoning his master’s debtors one by one, he said to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’ He said, ‘A hundred measures of oil.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.’ Then he said to another, ‘And how much do you owe?’ He said, ‘A hundred measures of wheat.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and write eighty.’ The master commended the dishonest manager for his shrewdness. For the sons of this world are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than the sons of light. And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of unrighteous wealth, so that when it fails they may receive you into the eternal dwellings.

10 “One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. 11 If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches? 12 And if you have not been faithful in that which is another’s, who will give you that which is your own? 13 No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.”

That Luther was not ready to admit that there were errors even in the numerical statements of the Bible we see in his exposition of Genesis 11:27, 28: “ is passage is among the most obscure statements of the Old Testament that has caused us many questions, which a diligent reader will encounter here and there in the older and more recent writers.— There is added another fault, that vain spirits hold it very praiseworthy if they can pass unrestricted judgments concerning the difficult and dark statements of Scripture and then can obstinately maintain their opinions. is is a disease of our nature against which an exegete of Holy Scripture should carefully guard himself.” Then he discusses the question as to what, in his opinion, makes these passages so difficult: “The second question is still more difficult, though neither Lyra nor the other teachers have paid attention to it. That in connection with Abraham sixty years are lost for us. For the reckoning the text brings with itself is easy. Terah was seventy years when he begot Abraham, now Abraham, when he was seventy five years old, left Haran, where Terah had died. If you add these together you will have 145 years. But when the account reckons together the years of Terah, it shows clearly that when he died he had lived 205 years. The question is, therefore, as to how we can account for these years. It would be unfitting to follow the example of audacious people who, when they arrive at such difficulties, immediately dare to correct books written by others. For my part I do not know how I should correctly solve the questions though I have carefully reckoned together the years of the world. So with a humble and proper confession of ignorance (for it is the Holy Ghost who alone knows and understands all things) I conclude that God, because of a certain plan of His own, caused seventy years to be lost out of Abraham’s life so that no one would venture from the exact computation of the years of the world to presume to predict something certain concerning the end of the world.” This hypothesis (because Luther does not express his opinion) may appear even absurd to us moderns, but it will not seem so absurd if we recall that at that time it was customary to place the age of the world at six thousand years, but Luther risks this hypothetical reckoning rather than to admit an error in the Biblical figure. He does not even consider the possibility of such an error. (52)

–Johann Michael Reu, Luther on the Scriptures

This daily Bible reading guide, Reading the Word of God, was conceived and prepared as a result of the ongoing discussions between representatives of three church bodies: Lutheran Church—Canada (LCC), The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the North American Lutheran Church (NALC). The following individuals have represented their church bodies and approved this introduction and the reading guide: LCC: President Robert Bugbee; NALC: Bishop John Bradosky, Revs. Mark Chavez, James Nestingen, and David Wendel; LCMS: Revs. Albert Collver, Joel Lehenbauer, John Pless, and Larry Vogel.

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