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Job 26 (ESV)

Job Replies: God’s Majesty Is Unsearchable

26 Then Job answered and said:

“How you have helped him who has no power!
How you have saved the arm that has no strength!
How you have counseled him who has no wisdom,
and plentifully declared sound knowledge!
With whose help have you uttered words,
and whose breath has come out from you?
The dead tremble
under the waters and their inhabitants.
Sheol is naked before God,
and Abaddon has no covering.
He stretches out the north over the void
and hangs the earth on nothing.
He binds up the waters in his thick clouds,
and the cloud is not split open under them.
He covers the face of the full moon
and spreads over it his cloud.
10  He has inscribed a circle on the face of the waters
at the boundary between light and darkness.
11  The pillars of heaven tremble
and are astounded at his rebuke.
12  By his power he stilled the sea;
by his understanding he shattered Rahab.
13  By his wind the heavens were made fair;
his hand pierced the fleeing serpent.
14  Behold, these are but the outskirts of his ways,
and how small a whisper do we hear of him!
But the thunder of his power who can understand?”

Psalm 107:23–43 (ESV)

23  Some went down to the sea in ships,
doing business on the great waters;

24  they saw the deeds of the Lord,
his wondrous works in the deep.

25  For he commanded and raised the stormy wind,
which lifted up the waves of the sea.

26  They mounted up to heaven; they went down to the depths;
their courage melted away in their evil plight;

27  they reeled and staggered like drunken men
and were at their wits’ end.

28  Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,
and he delivered them from their distress.

29  He made the storm be still,
and the waves of the sea were hushed.

30  Then they were glad that the waters were quiet,
and he brought them to their desired haven.

31  Let them thank the Lord for his steadfast love,
for his wondrous works to the children of man!

32  Let them extol him in the congregation of the people,
and praise him in the assembly of the elders.

33  He turns rivers into a desert,
springs of water into thirsty ground,

34  a fruitful land into a salty waste,
because of the evil of its inhabitants.

35  He turns a desert into pools of water,
a parched land into springs of water.

36  And there he lets the hungry dwell,
and they establish a city to live in;

37  they sow fields and plant vineyards
and get a fruitful yield.

38  By his blessing they multiply greatly,
and he does not let their livestock diminish.

39  When they are diminished and brought low
through oppression, evil, and sorrow,

40  he pours contempt on princes
and makes them wander in trackless wastes;

41  but he raises up the needy out of affliction
and makes their families like flocks.

42  The upright see it and are glad,
and all wickedness shuts its mouth.

43  Whoever is wise, let him attend to these things;
let them consider the steadfast love of the Lord.

Luke 15:1–10 (ESV)

The Parable of the Lost Sheep

15 Now the tax collectors and sinners were all drawing near to hear him. And the Pharisees and the scribes grumbled, saying, “This man receives sinners and eats with them.”

So he told them this parable: “What man of you, having a hundred sheep, if he has lost one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the open country, and go after the one that is lost, until he finds it? And when he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders, rejoicing. And when he comes home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost.’ Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance.

The Parable of the Lost Coin

“Or what woman, having ten silver coins, if she loses one coin, does not light a lamp and sweep the house and seek diligently until she finds it? And when she has found it, she calls together her friends and neighbors, saying, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost.’ 10 Just so, I tell you, there is joy before the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”

That Luther was not ready to admit that there were errors even in the numerical statements of the Bible we see in his exposition of Genesis 11:27, 28: “ is passage is among the most obscure statements of the Old Testament that has caused us many questions, which a diligent reader will encounter here and there in the older and more recent writers.— There is added another fault, that vain spirits hold it very praiseworthy if they can pass unrestricted judgments concerning the difficult and dark statements of Scripture and then can obstinately maintain their opinions. is is a disease of our nature against which an exegete of Holy Scripture should carefully guard himself.” Then he discusses the question as to what, in his opinion, makes these passages so difficult: “The second question is still more difficult, though neither Lyra nor the other teachers have paid attention to it. That in connection with Abraham sixty years are lost for us. For the reckoning the text brings with itself is easy. Terah was seventy years when he begot Abraham, now Abraham, when he was seventy five years old, left Haran, where Terah had died. If you add these together you will have 145 years. But when the account reckons together the years of Terah, it shows clearly that when he died he had lived 205 years. The question is, therefore, as to how we can account for these years. It would be unfitting to follow the example of audacious people who, when they arrive at such difficulties, immediately dare to correct books written by others. For my part I do not know how I should correctly solve the questions though I have carefully reckoned together the years of the world. So with a humble and proper confession of ignorance (for it is the Holy Ghost who alone knows and understands all things) I conclude that God, because of a certain plan of His own, caused seventy years to be lost out of Abraham’s life so that no one would venture from the exact computation of the years of the world to presume to predict something certain concerning the end of the world.” This hypothesis (because Luther does not express his opinion) may appear even absurd to us moderns, but it will not seem so absurd if we recall that at that time it was customary to place the age of the world at six thousand years, but Luther risks this hypothetical reckoning rather than to admit an error in the Biblical figure. He does not even consider the possibility of such an error. (52)

–Johann Michael Reu, Luther on the Scriptures

This daily Bible reading guide, Reading the Word of God, was conceived and prepared as a result of the ongoing discussions between representatives of three church bodies: Lutheran Church—Canada (LCC), The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the North American Lutheran Church (NALC). The following individuals have represented their church bodies and approved this introduction and the reading guide: LCC: President Robert Bugbee; NALC: Bishop John Bradosky, Revs. Mark Chavez, James Nestingen, and David Wendel; LCMS: Revs. Albert Collver, Joel Lehenbauer, John Pless, and Larry Vogel.

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