Home > Devotions > Daily Reading – October 20, 2018

Job 23:1–24:12 (ESV)

Job Replies: Where Is God?

23 Then Job answered and said:

“Today also my complaint is bitter;
my hand is heavy on account of my groaning.
Oh, that I knew where I might find him,
that I might come even to his seat!
I would lay my case before him
and fill my mouth with arguments.
I would know what he would answer me
and understand what he would say to me.
Would he contend with me in the greatness of his power?
No; he would pay attention to me.
There an upright man could argue with him,
and I would be acquitted forever by my judge.

“Behold, I go forward, but he is not there,
and backward, but I do not perceive him;
on the left hand when he is working, I do not behold him;
he turns to the right hand, but I do not see him.
10  But he knows the way that I take;
when he has tried me, I shall come out as gold.
11  My foot has held fast to his steps;
I have kept his way and have not turned aside.
12  I have not departed from the commandment of his lips;
I have treasured the words of his mouth more than my portion of food.
13  But he is unchangeable, and who can turn him back?
What he desires, that he does.
14  For he will complete what he appoints for me,
and many such things are in his mind.
15  Therefore I am terrified at his presence;
when I consider, I am in dread of him.
16  God has made my heart faint;
the Almighty has terrified me;
17  yet I am not silenced because of the darkness,
nor because thick darkness covers my face.

24 “Why are not times of judgment kept by the Almighty,
and why do those who know him never see his days?
Some move landmarks;
they seize flocks and pasture them.
They drive away the donkey of the fatherless;
they take the widow’s ox for a pledge.
They thrust the poor off the road;
the poor of the earth all hide themselves.
Behold, like wild donkeys in the desert
the poor go out to their toil, seeking game;
the wasteland yields food for their children.
They gather their fodder in the field,
and they glean the vineyard of the wicked man.
They lie all night naked, without clothing,
and have no covering in the cold.
They are wet with the rain of the mountains
and cling to the rock for lack of shelter.
(There are those who snatch the fatherless child from the breast,
and they take a pledge against the poor.)
10  They go about naked, without clothing;
hungry, they carry the sheaves;
11  among the olive rows of the wicked they make oil;
they tread the winepresses, but suffer thirst.
12  From out of the city the dying groan,
and the soul of the wounded cries for help;
yet God charges no one with wrong.

Psalm 106:24–48 (ESV)

24  Then they despised the pleasant land,
having no faith in his promise.

25  They murmured in their tents,
and did not obey the voice of the Lord.

26  Therefore he raised his hand and swore to them
that he would make them fall in the wilderness,

27  and would make their offspring fall among the nations,
scattering them among the lands.

28  Then they yoked themselves to the Baal of Peor,
and ate sacrifices offered to the dead;

29  they provoked the Lord to anger with their deeds,
and a plague broke out among them.

30  Then Phinehas stood up and intervened,
and the plague was stayed.

31  And that was counted to him as righteousness
from generation to generation forever.

32  They angered him at the waters of Meribah,
and it went ill with Moses on their account,

33  for they made his spirit bitter,
and he spoke rashly with his lips.

34  They did not destroy the peoples,
as the Lord commanded them,

35  but they mixed with the nations
and learned to do as they did.

36  They served their idols,
which became a snare to them.

37  They sacrificed their sons
and their daughters to the demons;

38  they poured out innocent blood,
the blood of their sons and daughters,
whom they sacrificed to the idols of Canaan,
and the land was polluted with blood.

39  Thus they became unclean by their acts,
and played the whore in their deeds.

40  Then the anger of the Lord was kindled against his people,
and he abhorred his heritage;

41  he gave them into the hand of the nations,
so that those who hated them ruled over them.

42  Their enemies oppressed them,
and they were brought into subjection under their power.

43  Many times he delivered them,
but they were rebellious in their purposes
and were brought low through their iniquity.

44  Nevertheless, he looked upon their distress,
when he heard their cry.

45  For their sake he remembered his covenant,
and relented according to the abundance of his steadfast love.

46  He caused them to be pitied
by all those who held them captive.

47  Save us, O Lord our God,
and gather us from among the nations,
that we may give thanks to your holy name
and glory in your praise.

48  Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel,
from everlasting to everlasting!
And let all the people say, “Amen!”
Praise the Lord!

Book Five

Luke 13:31–14:11 (ESV)

Lament over Jerusalem

31 At that very hour some Pharisees came and said to him, “Get away from here, for Herod wants to kill you.” 32 And he said to them, “Go and tell that fox, ‘Behold, I cast out demons and perform cures today and tomorrow, and the third day I finish my course. 33 Nevertheless, I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the day following, for it cannot be that a prophet should perish away from Jerusalem.’ 34 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! 35 Behold, your house is forsaken. And I tell you, you will not see me until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!’ ”

Healing of a Man on the Sabbath

14 One Sabbath, when he went to dine at the house of a ruler of the Pharisees, they were watching him carefully. And behold, there was a man before him who had dropsy. And Jesus responded to the lawyers and Pharisees, saying, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath, or not?” But they remained silent. Then he took him and healed him and sent him away. And he said to them, “Which of you, having a son or an ox that has fallen into a well on a Sabbath day, will not immediately pull him out?” And they could not reply to these things.

The Parable of the Wedding Feast

Now he told a parable to those who were invited, when he noticed how they chose the places of honor, saying to them, “When you are invited by someone to a wedding feast, do not sit down in a place of honor, lest someone more distinguished than you be invited by him, and he who invited you both will come and say to you, ‘Give your place to this person,’ and then you will begin with shame to take the lowest place. 10 But when you are invited, go and sit in the lowest place, so that when your host comes he may say to you, ‘Friend, move up higher.’ Then you will be honored in the presence of all who sit at table with you. 11 For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.”

That Luther was not ready to admit that there were errors even in the numerical statements of the Bible we see in his exposition of Genesis 11:27, 28: “ is passage is among the most obscure statements of the Old Testament that has caused us many questions, which a diligent reader will encounter here and there in the older and more recent writers.— There is added another fault, that vain spirits hold it very praiseworthy if they can pass unrestricted judgments concerning the difficult and dark statements of Scripture and then can obstinately maintain their opinions. is is a disease of our nature against which an exegete of Holy Scripture should carefully guard himself.” Then he discusses the question as to what, in his opinion, makes these passages so difficult: “The second question is still more difficult, though neither Lyra nor the other teachers have paid attention to it. That in connection with Abraham sixty years are lost for us. For the reckoning the text brings with itself is easy. Terah was seventy years when he begot Abraham, now Abraham, when he was seventy five years old, left Haran, where Terah had died. If you add these together you will have 145 years. But when the account reckons together the years of Terah, it shows clearly that when he died he had lived 205 years. The question is, therefore, as to how we can account for these years. It would be unfitting to follow the example of audacious people who, when they arrive at such difficulties, immediately dare to correct books written by others. For my part I do not know how I should correctly solve the questions though I have carefully reckoned together the years of the world. So with a humble and proper confession of ignorance (for it is the Holy Ghost who alone knows and understands all things) I conclude that God, because of a certain plan of His own, caused seventy years to be lost out of Abraham’s life so that no one would venture from the exact computation of the years of the world to presume to predict something certain concerning the end of the world.” This hypothesis (because Luther does not express his opinion) may appear even absurd to us moderns, but it will not seem so absurd if we recall that at that time it was customary to place the age of the world at six thousand years, but Luther risks this hypothetical reckoning rather than to admit an error in the Biblical figure. He does not even consider the possibility of such an error. (52)

–Johann Michael Reu, Luther on the Scriptures

This daily Bible reading guide, Reading the Word of God, was conceived and prepared as a result of the ongoing discussions between representatives of three church bodies: Lutheran Church—Canada (LCC), The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the North American Lutheran Church (NALC). The following individuals have represented their church bodies and approved this introduction and the reading guide: LCC: President Robert Bugbee; NALC: Bishop John Bradosky, Revs. Mark Chavez, James Nestingen, and David Wendel; LCMS: Revs. Albert Collver, Joel Lehenbauer, John Pless, and Larry Vogel.

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