Home > Devotions > Daily Reading – October 26, 2019

1 Chron. 8:1–40

8:1 Benjamin was the father of Bela, his firstborn; Ashbel was born second, Aharah third, 2Nohah fourth, and Rapha fifth.

3Bela’s sons were Addar, Gera, Abihud, 4Abishua, Naaman, Ahoah, 5Gera, Shephuphan, and Huram.

6These were the descendants of Ehud who were leaders of the families living in Geba who were forced to move to Manahath: 7Naaman, Ahijah, and Gera, who moved them. Gera was the father of Uzzah and Ahihud.

8Shaharaim fathered sons in Moab after he divorced his wives Hushim and Baara. 9By his wife Hodesh he fathered Jobab, Zibia, Mesha, Malkam, 10Jeuz, Sakia, and Mirmah. These were his sons; they were family leaders. 11By Hushim he fathered Abitub and Elpaal.

12The sons of Elpaal:

Eber, Misham, Shemed (who built Ono and Lod, as well as its surrounding towns), 13Beriah, and Shema. They were leaders of the families living in Aijalon and chased out the inhabitants of Gath.

14Ahio, Shashak, Jeremoth, 15Zebadiah, Arad, Eder, 16Michael, Ishpah, and Joha were the sons of Beriah.

17Zebadiah, Meshullam, Hizki, Heber, 18Ishmerai, Izliah, and Jobab were the sons of Elpaal.

19Jakim, Zikri, Zabdi, 20Elienai, Zillethai, Eliel, 21Adaiah, Beraiah, and Shimrath were the sons of Shimei.

22Ishpan, Eber, Eliel, 23Abdon, Zikri, Hanan, 24Hananiah, Elam, Anthothijah, 25Iphdeiah, and Penuel were the sons of Shashak.

26Shamsherai, Shechariah, Athaliah, 27Jaareshiah, Elijah, and Zikri were the sons of Jeroham. 28These were the family leaders listed in the genealogical records; they lived in Jerusalem.

29The father of Gibeon lived in Gibeon; his wife’s name was Maacah. 30His firstborn son was Abdon, followed by Zur, Kish, Baal, Nadab, 31Gedor, Ahio, Zeker, and Mikloth.

32Mikloth was the father of Shimeah. They also lived near their relatives in Jerusalem.

33Ner was the father of Kish, and Kish was the father of Saul. Saul was the father of Jonathan, Malki-Shua, Abinadab, and Eshbaal.

34The son of Jonathan:

Meribbaal.

Meribbaal was the father of Micah.

35The sons of Micah:

Pithon, Melech, Tarea, and Ahaz.

36Ahaz was the father of Jehoaddah, and Jehoaddah was the father of Alemeth, Azmaveth, and Zimri. Zimri was the father of Moza, 37and Moza was the father of Binea. His son was Raphah, whose son was Eleasah, whose son was Azel.

38Azel had six sons: Azrikam his firstborn, followed by Ishmael, Sheariah, Obadiah, and Hanan. All these were the sons of Azel.

39The sons of his brother Eshek:

Ulam was his firstborn, Jeush second, and Eliphelet third. 40The sons of Ulam were warriors who were adept archers. They had many sons and grandsons, a total of 150.

All these were the descendants of Benjamin.

(NET Bible)

Ps. 110

110:1 A psalm of David.

Here is the Lord’s proclamation to my lord:

“Sit down at my right hand until I make your enemies your footstool!”

2The Lord extends your dominion from Zion.

Rule in the midst of your enemies!

3Your people willingly follow you when you go into battle.

On the holy hills at sunrise the dew of your youth belongs to you.

4The Lord makes this promise on oath and will not revoke it:

“You are an eternal priest after the pattern of Melchizedek.”

5O Lord, at your right hand

he strikes down kings in the day he unleashes his anger.

6He executes judgment against the nations;

he fills the valleys with corpses;

he shatters their heads over the vast battlefield.

7From the stream along the road he drinks;

then he lifts up his head.

(NET Bible)

Mark 10:32–45

10:32 They were on the way, going up to Jerusalem. Jesus was going ahead of them, and they were amazed, but those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was going to happen to him. 33“Look, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and experts in the law. They will condemn him to death and will turn him over to the Gentiles. 34They will mock him, spit on him, flog him severely, and kill him. Yet after three days, he will rise again.”

35Then James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to him and said, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask.” 36He said to them, “What do you want me to do for you?” 37They said to him, “Permit one of us to sit at your right hand and the other at your left in your glory.” 38But Jesus said to them, “You don’t know what you are asking! Are you able to drink the cup I drink or be baptized with the baptism I experience?” 39They said to him, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “You will drink the cup I drink, and you will be baptized with the baptism I experience, 40but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give. It is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

41Now when the other ten heard this, they became angry with James and John. 42Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that those who are recognized as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and those in high positions use their authority over them. 43But it is not this way among you. Instead whoever wants to be great among you must be your servant, 44and whoever wants to be first among you must be the slave of all. 45For even the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

(NET Bible)

The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2016.

That Luther was not ready to admit that there were errors even in the numerical statements of the Bible we see in his exposition of Genesis 11:27, 28: “ is passage is among the most obscure statements of the Old Testament that has caused us many questions, which a diligent reader will encounter here and there in the older and more recent writers.— There is added another fault, that vain spirits hold it very praiseworthy if they can pass unrestricted judgments concerning the difficult and dark statements of Scripture and then can obstinately maintain their opinions. is is a disease of our nature against which an exegete of Holy Scripture should carefully guard himself.” Then he discusses the question as to what, in his opinion, makes these passages so difficult: “The second question is still more difficult, though neither Lyra nor the other teachers have paid attention to it. That in connection with Abraham sixty years are lost for us. For the reckoning the text brings with itself is easy. Terah was seventy years when he begot Abraham, now Abraham, when he was seventy five years old, left Haran, where Terah had died. If you add these together you will have 145 years. But when the account reckons together the years of Terah, it shows clearly that when he died he had lived 205 years. The question is, therefore, as to how we can account for these years. It would be unfitting to follow the example of audacious people who, when they arrive at such difficulties, immediately dare to correct books written by others. For my part I do not know how I should correctly solve the questions though I have carefully reckoned together the years of the world. So with a humble and proper confession of ignorance (for it is the Holy Ghost who alone knows and understands all things) I conclude that God, because of a certain plan of His own, caused seventy years to be lost out of Abraham’s life so that no one would venture from the exact computation of the years of the world to presume to predict something certain concerning the end of the world.” This hypothesis (because Luther does not express his opinion) may appear even absurd to us moderns, but it will not seem so absurd if we recall that at that time it was customary to place the age of the world at six thousand years, but Luther risks this hypothetical reckoning rather than to admit an error in the Biblical figure. He does not even consider the possibility of such an error. (52)

–Johann Michael Reu, Luther on the Scriptures

This daily Bible reading guide, Reading the Word of God, was conceived and prepared as a result of the ongoing discussions between representatives of three church bodies: Lutheran Church—Canada (LCC), The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the North American Lutheran Church (NALC). The following individuals have represented their church bodies and approved this introduction and the reading guide: LCC: President Robert Bugbee; NALC: Bishop John Bradosky, Revs. Mark Chavez, James Nestingen, and David Wendel; LCMS: Revs. Albert Collver, Joel Lehenbauer, John Pless, and Larry Vogel.

Learn More